News & Events | Neeley in the News 

Here is a brief look at some of the recent news stories that featured Neeley students, staff and faculty. For a complete look at Neeley in the News, check out In the News Archives

StarTelegram

January 25, 2017
TCU Neeley expansion project gets $5.5 million gift – by Max Baker

Texas Christian University’s Neeley School of Business announced Wednesday a $5.5 million gift from a leading Houston business executive to support its $100 million expansion plans.

Tom Sumner, CEO and chairman of Allpoints Service Corp., which provides land-surveying services to home builders, made the gift along with his wife, Marilyn. He serves on TCU’s board of trustees.

Chancellor Victor J. Boschini Jr. praised the Sumners for supporting TCU and Neeley. About one-third of the undergraduate and graduate students at TCU go through the business school.

“Their gift moves us closer to completing the necessary financial commitments for the Neeley School building expansion project,” Boschini said in a prepared statement.

The school kicked off its campaign to expand the business school in 2015. It will be done in two phases: $75 million for new construction and $25 million for renovation of existing buildings. So far, TCU has raised $53 million toward the new-construction phase, said Neeley School Dean O. Homer Erekson.

Construction is set to begin this year.

“Tom Sumner knows that building a successful business begins with a first-rate business education in a thriving environment,” Erekson said.

Sumner, who earned undergraduate and graduate degrees at TCU, credits his business success to what he learned at the university, the Arthur Anderson Andersen accounting firm and a mortgage company. He said as an MBA student he learned he could compete with classmates who were older and more experienced.

“I could go head to head with them in the arena of ideas, case competitions and debates, and that gave me a boost of confidence,” Sumner said in a statement. “An entrepreneur has to have confidence.”

“Now Marilyn and I want to see the Neeley School build on its reputation and give more students the opportunity to create jobs and build companies from the things they learn at TCU,” he said.

Marilyn Sumner, who runs a consulting firm in Houston that advises school districts, earned an education degree at TCU.

The new and expanded facilities will include new south and east wings, innovative classrooms and learning spaces, a large auditorium, and the latest technological advances in higher education. A U-shaped design includes an outdoor plaza and indoor rotunda as gathering places.

The fundraising campaign received a big boost when it received a $30 million foundational gift from Spencer and Marlene Hays. As a result, the project will be named in their honor as the Spencer and Marlene Hays Business Commons. The complex will be built near the existing business school buildings.

logo Dallas Morning News lg

January 25, 2017
TCU’s big business school expansion gets $5.5 million boost from Houston executive

Texas Christian University’s Neeley School of Business announced Wednesday a $5.5 million gift from a leading Houston business executive to support its $100 million expansion plan.

Tom Sumner, CEO and chairman of Allpoints Service Corp., which provides land-surveying services to home builders, made the gift along with his wife, Marilyn. He serves on TCU’s board of trustees.

Chancellor Victor J. Boschini Jr. praised the Sumners for supporting TCU and Neeley. About one-third of the undergraduate and graduate students at TCU go through the business school.

"Their gift moves us closer to completing the necessary financial commitments for the Neeley School building expansion project," Boschini said in a prepared statement.

The school kicked off its campaign to expand the business school in 2015. It will be done in two phases: $75 million for new construction and $25 million for renovation of existing buildings. So far, TCU has raised $53 million toward the new-construction phase, said Neeley School Dean O. Homer Erekson.

Construction is set to begin this year.

"Tom Sumner knows that building a successful business begins with a first-rate business education in a thriving environment," Erekson said.

Sumner, who earned undergraduate and graduate degrees at TCU, credits his business success to what he learned at the university, the Arthur Anderson Andersen accounting firm and a mortgage company. He said as an MBA student he learned he could compete with classmates who were older and more experienced.

logo FW Business Press

January 25, 2017
TCU’s Neeley School receives $5.5 million

Tom Sumner, a leading Houston business executive who serves on the Board of Trustees for Texas Christian University, and his wife Marilyn, have made a $5.5 million leadership gift to support the planned expansion of the TCU Neeley School of Business. Both are TCU alumni.

Tom Sumner has founded six successful companies since 1979. He is currently CEO and chairman of Allpoints Service Corp., which provides land surveying services to home builders. He earned his BBA from TCU in 1967 and MBA in 1968. Marilyn Sumner was a career education administrator before co-founding a consulting company to advise school districts in the Houston area. She currently serves on several nonprofit boards. She earned her education degree from TCU in 1968.

“We are appreciative of Tom and Marilyn for their important support of TCU and the Neeley School of Business,” Chancellor Victor J. Boschini Jr said. “Their gift moves us closer to completing the necessary financial commitments for the Neeley School building expansion project.”

The new and expanded facilities will include new south and east wings, innovative classrooms and learning spaces, a large auditorium and the latest technological advances in higher education.

Sumner credits his entrepreneurial success to the skills he learned at TCU, Arthur Anderson and at a mortgage company.

As a TCU MBA student, he learned he could compete with classmates who were older and had more work experience. “I could go head to head with them in the arena of ideas, case competitions and debates, and that gave me a boost of confidence,” he said. “An entrepreneur has to have confidence.”

After graduation he worked for accounting firm Arthur Anderson, where he learned to identify and solve problems, and then he worked for a mortgage company/REIT and learned skills in lending, mortgage, borrowing, finance, real estate and how a deal is structured.

But it all began with his TCU Neeley education and experience.

“Now Marilyn and I want to see the Neeley School build on its reputation and give more students the opportunity to create jobs and build companies from the things they learn at TCU,” he said.

“Tom Sumner knows that building a successful business begins with a first-rate business education in a thriving environment,” said O. Homer Erekson, the John V. Roach Dean of the Neeley School. “This significant gift will further enhance TCU Neeley’s growing reputation as a world-class, values-centered school of business that produces students who make a meaningful impact on their community and the world.”

The expansion and renovation of the TCU Neeley School of Business is planned to begin in 2017. When completed, the combined new facilities will be called the Spencer and Marlene Hays Business Commons, in recognition of a $30 million foundational gift from the Hays.

logo wallethub

January 30, 2017
What are the best second chance credit cards? - By John Kiernan

The best second chance credit card is the cheapest offer that you can get approved for with damaged credit. After all, your top priority at this point in your credit career should be to open a credit card and make on-time payments in order to add positive information to your credit reports every month. Beyond that, you should try to save as much money as possible.

Unless you absolutely need an emergency loan, placing a refundable security deposit to open a secured credit card account is the best way to make the most of your second chance. The deposit makes it a lot easier to get approved, and you’ll get it back when you close your account in good standing. An unsecured credit card for bad credit, on the other hand, is likely to have high, non-refundable fees and provide only a very small credit line.

Ask The Experts: Mauricio Rodriguez, Professor and Chair of the Finance Department in the Neeley School of Business at Texas Christian University

Q. What incentive does a bank or credit union have to offer second chance credit cards?

A. To make more money via higher interest rates that can be charged for higher risk customers. Also, potential benefits from building relationships with individuals that improve their payment patterns.

Q. Is it worth giving credit cards a second chance if you’ve had bad experiences with them in the past?

A. It can be worth it for the reasons stated above. This would not be done just for one or two individuals, but for many. That helps diversify risk by having some workout that offsets those that do not work out. It is worth it, when those that work out outweigh those that do not.

Q. What advice do you have for someone who is looking for a second chance credit card?

A. Live within your means, stay within your stated credit limits, and pay your debts on time.

Q. Will it be easier or harder to get a second chance credit card 12 months from now?

A. Probably similar, but rates are expected to be higher.

Q. Which credit card companies are most and least likely to give a second chance to consumers with negative items on their credit reports?

A. Some companies choose to focus in this area and that can change from time to time.

logo Philanthropy

January 30, 2017
Gifts Roundup: Texas Christian University

Tom and Marilyn Sumner gave $5.5 million to back the expansion of the Neeley School of Business.

Mr. Sumner leads AllPoints Service Corporation, which provides land-surveying services to homebuilders. He earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the university in 1967 and 1968, respectively.

Ms. Sumner, who earned a bachelor’s degree from Texas Christian in 1968, is a former education administrator and co-founder of a consulting company that advises school districts in the Houston area.

 

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